Aloha and Welcome to Sacred Heart Church Pahoa

“Cor ad cor” ... Heart to heart!


 

The Stewardship Way of Life


How do we pray with Sacred Scripture? 


Spiritual reading of Sacred Scripture, especially the Gospels, is an important form of meditation. This spiritual reading is traditionally called lectio divina or divine reading. Lectio divina is prayer over the Scriptures.

The first element of this type of prayer is reading (lectio): you take a short passage from the Bible, preferably a Gospel passage and read it carefully, perhaps three or more times. Let it really soak-in.

The second element is meditation (meditatio). By using your imagination enter into the Biblical scene in order to "see" the setting, the people, and the unfolding action. It is through this meditation that you encounter the text and discover its meaning for your life.

The next element is prayer (oratio) or your personal response to the text: asking for graces, offering praise or thanksgiving, seeking healing or forgiveness. In this prayerful engagement with the text, you open yourself up to the possibility of contemplation.

Contemplation (contemplatio) is a gaze turned toward Christ and the things of God. By God's action of grace, you may be raised above meditation to a state of seeing or experiencing the text as mystery and reality. In contemplation, you come into an experiential contact with the One behind and beyond the text.


Meet Father John Molina

Church In An Old Hawaiian Town - by John Noble 
 
 

 



 

It Took a Village to Raise a Village

   
The donation of land by the Diocese of Honolulu has motivated the creation of a neighborhood of micro-houses for families left homeless by Kilauea volcano. By Patrick Downes
Hawaii Catholic Herald     

                
Is Stephen Hawking Right About God?
Bishop Robert Barron 
 


 

Bishop Barron: The Mystery of the Mass - The Source and Summit of Christian Life

 

 

 

 

 

Mass Schedule


 

Sunday
7:00am, 9:00am, and 11:00am

 

Daily 

 Monday, Wed-Saturday 8:00am  

 

Saturday Vigil - 5:00pm

First Friday 

Star of the Sea Painted Church

4:00pm

Confession

   Saturdays 4:20-4:50pm. or by appointment

 

Bulletin

Calendar

 

Daily Mass Readings and Reflections


Gospel Reading
Mark 13:24-32
Jesus teaches about the signs of the coming of the Son of Man.

Family Connection

Many things in our lives and in our world are subject to change. Yet all of us find security in relationships and values that endure. Foremost among these are our family relationships. We can confidently accept change if we know that we will continue to be loved by our family and by God. We help impart this sense of trust and confidence in our children with our daily assurances to them that nothing can change our love for them.

As you gather as a family, look through several family photo albums. Observe and talk about things that have changed in your family life over the years. Talk also about the things that have stayed the same. We do not need to fear changes in our family life because we know that the most important aspects of our family life do not change, such as our love for one another. The same is true with God and God’s love for us. Read today’s Gospel, Mark 13:24-32. Jesus teaches us that things in our world will change and that the world itself will one day end. We don’t need to be fearful because God’s love for us will never end. Conclude in prayer together thanking God his never-ending love for us. Pray together the Glory Be to the Father.


Fr. Thomas Keating March 7, 1923 - October 25, 2018.  For more on this leader of Christian contemplation and interfaith dialogue, for resources on practicing Centering Prayer, and to read and share stories, visit https://contemplativeoutreach.org.   A 19-minute memorial video is also on YouTube:  "Thomas Keating - A Life Surrendered to Love."


Parish & Diocesan Giving
For most Catholics, opportunities for giving begin in their parish and diocese.  Diocesan and parish stewardship programs should help individuals, families and  communities better understand why, in the context of a total commitment to stewardship that is planned, proportionate, and sacrificial, it is important to set goals for giving.  All Christian stewards must consider prayerfully the gifts they have received from God, and they should make a decision (in advance from the "first fruits" instead of what is left over after obligations have been met) about what will be given. Many parishes now offer electronic funds transfer options for the weekly offertory in addition to the traditional envelope system to help families and individuals meet their stewardship commitments